Discover History, Art, Writings - Primary Sources from Biblical Times to the 21st Century Discover History, Art, Writings - Primary Sources from Biblical Times to the 21st Century
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Shepherd with Lamb (1997) by Naftali Bezem (b. 1924)
German-born painter, muralist, and sculptor Naftali Bezem was sent to Palestine on Youth Aliyah by his family in 1939. He studied art at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and at the Centre d’Arts Sacré in Paris. He is best known for two of his commissioned works, the metal relief at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem and the ceiling painting in the president’s residence in Jerusalem. Image courtesy of Pucker Gallery, Boston
http://www.puckergallery.com.
Photo by Andy Abrahamson.

What is The Posen Library?

The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization is a vibrant, growing collection curated by leading Jewish Studies scholars which offers unprecedented direct access to thousands of primary sources reflecting Jewish creativity, diversity, and culture world-wide, spanning biblical times to the 21st century.

Many of these original sources are works translated into English for the first time.

The sacred and secular are side by side here, for readers, researchers, educators, scholars, students, anyone interested in discovering Jewish history, biography, fiction, religious and political writing, art, cultural artifacts...

THE POSEN LIBRARY IS AVAILABLE IN TWO FORMATS:

In print: Ten beautifully illustrated volumes being published by Yale University Press
Online: The Posen Digital Library (PDL), an interactive database, available free upon registration.

Register on the PDL for free now!

Go to The Posen Library Home Page for more information or to log in

Return to discover more Jewish creativity and history!

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Nine Out of Four Hundred (The West and the Rest) (1997)
by Meir Gal (b. 1958)

Israeli-born Meir Gal tackles political and social issues in his art. Among his best-known works are those that protest discrimination against Israel’s Mizrahim. In 1997, he received the Tel Aviv Museum of Art Award. Gal is a lecturer at the City University of New York and at the School of Visual Arts, where he has developed and taught courses on art and activism. Image courtesy of the artist.

JUST PUBLISHED!
The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 6: Confronting Modernity, 1750–1880

Henriette Herz as Hebe (1778)
by Anna Dorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch (1721–1782)

Henriette Herz was a famous Berlin salon host, translator, and memoirist. Her iconic portrait, in which she posed at age fourteen as Hebe, the goddess of youth, was painted by Anna Dorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch (1721–1782), one of the few female court painters active in the eighteenth century. Biographical details on Herz appear in the section on Literature, in Volume 6. Image courtesy of bpk Bildagentur / Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany / Joerg P. Anders / Art Resource, NY
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Edited by Elisheva Carlebach, Salo Wittmayer Baron Professor of Jewish History, Culture, and Society; Director, The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies, Columbia University.

Representing a tumultuous time of changing borders, demographic shifts, and significant Jewish migration, when "every aspect of Jewish life underwent the most profound changes to have occurred since antiquity," The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 6: Confronting Modernity, 1750–1880 is beautifully illustrated and covers:

  • - LITERATURE (life writing, travel writing, folktales, fiction, and poetry)
  • - VISUAL AND MATERIAL CULTURE (from salon life to folk art, ritual objects, painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture)
  • - INTELLECTUAL CULTURE (rabbinic and religious thought, science and scholarship, political thinking, and journalism)
  • - PERFORMING ARTS (theater, opera, music)

Press Release and Contact: Download Here

Image of The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 6: Confronting Modernity, 1750-1880

Buy Volume 6 now to gift or collect!

Buy Volume 6 now to gift or collect!

Content from Volume 6 is available online now!

Register on the PDL for free now!

The PDL is a free, living digital library that is updated as each new volume of The Posen Library is completed.

Return to discover more Jewish creativity and history!

Many thanks to everyone who visited us at Booth #313 at the Association for Jewish Studies Conference in San Diego (December 15–17, 2019) Congratulations to the winner of the free copy of Volume 6, Marci Freedman of Illinois!

Image Credits

1. Shepherd with Lamb (1997) by Naftali Bezem (b. 1924)
German-born painter, muralist, and sculptor Naftali Bezem was sent to Palestine on Youth Aliyah by his family in 1939. He studied art at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and at the Centre d’Arts Sacré in Paris. He is best known for two of his commissioned works, the metal relief at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem and the ceiling painting in the president’s residence in Jerusalem.
Image courtesy of Pucker Gallery, Boston, http://www.puckergallery.com. Photo by Andy Abrahamson.

2. Nine Out of Four Hundred (The West and the Rest) (1997) by Meir Gal (b. 1958)
Israeli-born Meir Gal tackles political and social issues in his art. Among his best-known works are those that protest discrimination against Israel’s Mizrahim. In 1997, he received the Tel Aviv Museum of Art Award. Gal is a lecturer at the City University of New York and at the School of Visual Arts, where he has developed and taught courses on art and activism.
Image courtesy of the artist.

3. Henriette Herz as Hebe (1778) by Anna Dorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch (1721–1782)
Henriette Herz was a famous Berlin salon host, translator, and memoirist. Her iconic portrait, in which she posed at age fourteen as Hebe, the goddess of youth, was painted by Anna Dorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch (1721–1782), one of the few female court painters active in the eighteenth century. Biographical details on Herz appear in the section on Literature, in Volume 6.
Image courtesy of bpk Bildagentur / Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany / Joerg P. Anders / Art Resource, NY

4. Ghetto Theatre (1920) by David Bomberg (1890-1957)
The painter David Bomberg was one of the “Whitechapel Boys,” the cohort of Jewish writers and painters who emerged from the immigrant quarter of East London in the early twentieth century. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art from 1911 to 1913 but was expelled for the radicalism of his style, which was influenced by Italian futurism and cubism. After the war, his style changed and he began to focus on landscapes. From 1923 to 1927, he painted and sketched in Mandate Palestine with the financial support of the Zionist movement. He is considered one of the greatest painters of twentieth-century Britain.
Image © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London. Courtesy of Ben Uri, the London Jewish Museum of Art.

5. The Autumn of Central Paris (after Walter Benjamin) (1972-73) by R. B. Kitaj (1932-2007)
American-born R. B. Kitaj spent the most influential years of his painting career in England, where he settled in 1958. He was a member of a group of artists at the Royal College of Art in London that promoted pop art. Kitaj was controversial for his outspokenness in favor of figurative art. Among his most important exhibitions was a Tate Gallery retrospective (in 1994). He was elected to the Royal Academy in 1991, the first American to win this honor in almost a century. In 1995, he received the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale.
Image © R. B. Kitaj Estate. Collection Mrs. Susan Lloyd, New York.